Drawn Conversations 2

Notes on a Table series,  performance drawing, Drawn Together: Maryclare Foá, Jane Grisewood, Birgitta Hosea, Carali McCall,  June – August 2016

Notes on a Table (Peckham) 5 June 2016
Notes on a Table (Kleine Red) 2 July 2016
Notes on a Table (Folkestone Green) and  (Folkestone Blue) 25 August 2016, performance drawing @ Whelkboy Gallery, Creative Quarter, Folkestone
Notes on a Table (Markings) 8–9 July 2016,  ‘Markings: Illustration and Performance Festival’ @ Central Saint Martins, Granary Square Kings Cross London. Drawn Together performed in the Lethaby Gallery (drawing 240 x 128 cm). Along with live performances the festival included a symposium, film screening, workshops and exhibitions with broad themes on theatre, fashion and drawing.

 

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Blind Lines

Perform-ance Confer-ence @ Dove Street Studios, Norwich
28 November 2014
Blind Lines, two-hour performance drawing, with eyes closed throughout, using the wall as a canvas. The audience was invited to replicate the action and sensation of drawing ‘blind’ on the gallery wall. The event explored the relationship between artist and audience, and questioned the response to live action. Presented by Hannah Turner Wallis.
Supported by Norwich Arts Centre and Other/Other/Other.

reveal/conceal

reveal/conceal @ House no.25 London N16, 26 November 2014
Six-hour wall drawings, covering in dark and uncovering in light, with Carali McCall and documented by photographer Marco Berardi, during the early stages of the internal demolition of a Victorian 4-storey house. Graphite durational wall drawing, 400 x 220 cm; Acrylic paint on glass durational drawing, 110 x 110 cm

The Blackest Black 2014

Performance drawing Line Dialogue (above left) and a selection of my paintings, drawings and photographs (above right) have featured in Jeremy Brock’s play, ‘The Blackest Black’, Hampstead Downstairs theatre 9 January – 8 February 2014

Artist friend and performance drawing collaborator, Carali McCall writes:
.. …Demonstrating the crossover from one artistic medium to another, writer Jeremy Brock took inspiration from artist Jane Grisewood, and as part of the second act of the play, a short version of Line Dialogue was performed by the actors as a  3-minute detail of our longer durational 1 to 2 hour drawing performances. … …
The following  extract from the interview with writer Jeremy Brock, discussing his new play,  with Hampstead’s features editor, Susie Benson, reveals the trigger for The Blackest Black: … … … Brock has always been interested in science ‘with an amateur’s obtuseness and enthusiasm’, especially the way scientists seem to ‘engage their imaginations and the whole of themselves’. But the trigger for The Blackest Black was meeting an artist, Jane Grisewood, at a party and hearing that she was just about to start a secondment at a US government observatory in Tucson: ‘All those feelings I’ve had about art and science suddenly came together and I realised I just needed to go.’ Laughingly he adds that it might sound ‘rather stalkerish’ but Grisewood was happy for him to research while she was completing her project, and watching the way she approached her work was very instructive…. … …
Read full interview: The Blackest Black 

see earlier post: The Blackest Black 8 February 2013
Hampstead Theatre
Director: Michael Longhurst   Designer: Oliver Townsend
Cast: Ian Bonar, John Light, Charity Wakefield
Photographs by Robert Day and Becky Paris, Hampstead Theatre

Traction talks art and science

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Traction Magazine talks art and science with artist Jane Grisewood

interviewEd by editor SUSIE PENTELOW
READ FULL INTERVIEW: Traction Magazine INTERVIEW

Mourning Lines

Mourning Lines in ‘Book Act’ @ The Tetley, Leeds,  March 2014
Live performance  9 March 2014 accompanied by video (2006/2014)
and artist book (2010)

  • 3 book set in slipcase acquired by the Tate Library Collection

Since the first ‘ash walk’ in 2005, and subsequent video a year later, I have performed Mourning Lines many times in many different ways, from drawing lines on paper,  to simply walking between familiar and poignant places. For this event Mourning Lines comprised of three different media:
Performance: 30-minute performance drawing with invitation to the audience to participate; charcoal on paper, overall 500 x 75 cm
Video: Recording of live performance trailing ash on 500-metre walk between home and the village burial ground. DVD; silent; 9’42”; filmed and edited by Ron Suffield
Book:  Accompanying book with sequence of 7 graphite drawings made during walks.

Draw to Perform

Draw to Perform – Drawing Performance Symposium
@  Arebyte Gallery and ]performance s p a c e[ London
5-7 December 2013  Curated by Ram Samocha
Participating artists: John Court, Tony Orrico, Michel Platnic, dolanbay, Michael Namkung, Vera Martins, Daniel Ben-Hur, Judith ann Braun, Stuart Brisley, Robert Luzar, Kimbal Quist Bumstead, Katrina Brown, Ram Samocha, Hannah Turner Wallis, Nazir Tanbouli, Sally Madge, Jane Grisewood, Carali McCall, Maryclare Foá, Birgitta Hosea, Diogo Pimentão.

Draw to Perform curator Ram Samocha invited 20 artists to participate in the event, 10 giving live performances, including Carali McCall and myself. With cameras strapped to our bodies, we repeatedly marked the wall with charcoal and graphite as we moved back and forth throughout the 30-minute duration of the line dialogue performance. The 3-day symposium included evening video screenings as well as live drawing performances and discussions led by Ram Samocha, Nick Kaye, Professor of Performance Studies, University of Exeter and selected artists. Samocha writes: ‘The symposium will concentrate on the connection between performance art and drawing and the relevance of drawing as a modern medium. The symposium includes video screenings, live drawing performances, talks and lectures by artists and art historians.This symposium aims to promote the growing stream of live drawing performance, to distinguish it as a unique entity and allow it to rise from the eclectic, wider definition of performance art.
The twenty participating artists all consider their body of work to be fundamentally concerned with drawing, in that for them drawing connects elements of line, movement, space and time.’

VIEW http://vimeo.com/80489035