VOID

VOID @ St John on Bethnal Green, London  21 June – 7 July  2016
Artists: Louise Beer, Jane Grisewood, John Hooper, Rebecca Huxley, Melanie King, Joshua Space and  Sarah Sparkes. Talk from Chris Welch, Professor of Space
Engineering at the International Space University in Strasbourg, France.
1.BonBbw.IMG_6125lr  Blacker than Black IMG_6604 BlackHolebwlr IMG_6390  BlackHolesbwlr IMG_6378

My Black on Black: series of 22 drawings plus one wall hanging explore darkness, blackness – the void – through different black paints on black paper (31 x 31 each/ installation 190  x 126cm; wall hanging 250 x 150cm). Black Hole series: 20 photographs present a typology of voids found in numerous locations around the world (21 x 21cm each / installation 164 x 135cm).  Blacker than Black:  The optical black surface was developed specially for space telescopes and satellites as it absorbs almost all light (30 x 30cm) .

Aether #3 London

Aether#3 @ Imperial College, London, 29 April – 23 May 2016

Accretion DSC04116lrThe artists, using various processes, explore seemingly unrepresentable and unimaginable phenomena in outer space. I am exhibiting Accretion: black hole & quasar, comprising two drawings, with co-curators  Melanie King and Louise Beer, and Emma Backlund, Myka Baum, Marianne Bjornmyr, Lucy Eldridge, Susan Eyre, Adam Ferris, Michaela French, Zanny Mellor, Lisa Pettibone, and Himali Singh Soin.
Accretion: black hole & quasar reflects positive and negative, stillness and movement. Ink on paper, each 40 x 50 cm.

 

 

 

Mauna Kea: Sky Island

Artist-in-Residence at Mauna Kea observatories, Hawaii, USA 
1 – 28 November 2015

IMAGES TO FOLLOW

The one-month Mauna Kea residency (following Kitt Peak in Arizona and Cerro Tololo in Chile in 2012) was a phenomenal experience, especially working with three significant observatories: Gemini (I was based in the headquarters in Hilo), Keck and Subaru . I spent hours observing the constant movement in the massive sanctuary-like structures where engineers worked tirelessly on Mauna Kea. The summit was breathtakingly beautiful and exhilarating, a ‘sky island’, towering 40% into the atmosphere at 4205 metres (13,796ft), despite the zero temperatures and low oxygen. Everything changed at sunset as a magical golden glow morphed into a deep red before darkness came. The experience of spending time in the three observatories was dramatic in every way, making it difficult to find words to describe the intensity and awe of seeing and feeling of this cosmological wonder.