Drawn Conversations

Notes on a Table,  Maryclare Foá, Jane Grisewood, Birgitta Hosea, Carali McCall), Drawn Conversations exhibition @ Coventry University
4 December 2015

Top right: Notes on a Table (Reunion) 2015  240 x 128 cm, graphite and coloured pencil on paper  Bottom: Notes on a Table (after John Cage) 2010 240 x 128 cm, graphite and black crayon on paper

‘Drawn Together’, formed in 2008, is a London-based group of four artists who collaborate on performance drawing projects and share theoretical and research interests. Working with graphite and light, sound and animation they perform drawing processes and address the relationship between the body and presence, time and space. Notes on a Table includes two large drawings (each two-hour duration) made while in conversation gathered around a rectangular kitchen table. The first drawing in 2010 was followed by a second one this year, on the same surface in the same space to prompt conversation on what drawing together again might mean, or change,  five years on. This exhibition curated by Jill Journeaux and Helen Gorrill was part of the Drawing Conversations symposium reflecting on collective and collaborative drawing experiences.

reveal/conceal

reveal/conceal @ House no.25 London N16, 26 November 2014
Six-hour wall drawings, covering in dark and uncovering in light, with Carali McCall and documented by photographer Marco Berardi, during the early stages of the internal demolition of a Victorian 4-storey house. Graphite durational wall drawing, 400 x 220 cm; Acrylic paint on glass durational drawing, 110 x 110 cm

The Blackest Black 2014

Performance drawing Line Dialogue (above left) and a selection of my paintings, drawings and photographs (above right) have featured in Jeremy Brock’s play, ‘The Blackest Black’, Hampstead Downstairs theatre 9 January – 8 February 2014

Artist friend and performance drawing collaborator, Carali McCall writes:
.. …Demonstrating the crossover from one artistic medium to another, writer Jeremy Brock took inspiration from artist Jane Grisewood, and as part of the second act of the play, a short version of Line Dialogue was performed by the actors as a  3-minute detail of our longer durational 1 to 2 hour drawing performances. … …
The following  extract from the interview with writer Jeremy Brock, discussing his new play,  with Hampstead’s features editor, Susie Benson, reveals the trigger for The Blackest Black: … … … Brock has always been interested in science ‘with an amateur’s obtuseness and enthusiasm’, especially the way scientists seem to ‘engage their imaginations and the whole of themselves’. But the trigger for The Blackest Black was meeting an artist, Jane Grisewood, at a party and hearing that she was just about to start a secondment at a US government observatory in Tucson: ‘All those feelings I’ve had about art and science suddenly came together and I realised I just needed to go.’ Laughingly he adds that it might sound ‘rather stalkerish’ but Grisewood was happy for him to research while she was completing her project, and watching the way she approached her work was very instructive…. … …
Read full interview: The Blackest Black 

see earlier post: The Blackest Black 8 February 2013
Hampstead Theatre
Director: Michael Longhurst   Designer: Oliver Townsend
Cast: Ian Bonar, John Light, Charity Wakefield
Photographs by Robert Day and Becky Paris, Hampstead Theatre

Draw to Perform

Draw to Perform – Drawing Performance Symposium
@  Arebyte Gallery and ]performance s p a c e[ London
5-7 December 2013  Curated by Ram Samocha
Participating artists: John Court, Tony Orrico, Michel Platnic, dolanbay, Michael Namkung, Vera Martins, Daniel Ben-Hur, Judith ann Braun, Stuart Brisley, Robert Luzar, Kimbal Quist Bumstead, Katrina Brown, Ram Samocha, Hannah Turner Wallis, Nazir Tanbouli, Sally Madge, Jane Grisewood, Carali McCall, Maryclare Foá, Birgitta Hosea, Diogo Pimentão.

Draw to Perform curator Ram Samocha invited 20 artists to participate in the event, 10 giving live performances, including Carali McCall and myself. With cameras strapped to our bodies, we repeatedly marked the wall with charcoal and graphite as we moved back and forth throughout the 30-minute duration of the line dialogue performance. The 3-day symposium included evening video screenings as well as live drawing performances and discussions led by Ram Samocha, Nick Kaye, Professor of Performance Studies, University of Exeter and selected artists. Samocha writes: ‘The symposium will concentrate on the connection between performance art and drawing and the relevance of drawing as a modern medium. The symposium includes video screenings, live drawing performances, talks and lectures by artists and art historians.This symposium aims to promote the growing stream of live drawing performance, to distinguish it as a unique entity and allow it to rise from the eclectic, wider definition of performance art.
The twenty participating artists all consider their body of work to be fundamentally concerned with drawing, in that for them drawing connects elements of line, movement, space and time.’

VIEW http://vimeo.com/80489035

On Duration

JG on duration

Performance Research, Volume 17 No. 5 October 2012
Published by Routledge ISSN 1352-8165 (print) ISSN 1469-9990 (online)
To view article Click: On Duration 

LINE DIALOGUES: MARKING TIME AND PROCESS
Jane Grisewood and Carali McCall
The artists’ pages in Performance Research journal’s On Duration October issue present images from our performative-based art practice, which interrogates the relationship between drawing and performance to explore themes of duration, movement and the transmission of energy. The repetitive and continuous action of mark-making in the one to two-hour performances identifies the body as a tool to stretch time and record temporal presence, while challenging how the body experiences duration through drawing. Carali and I have collaborated on drawing performances in the UK and abroad for six years, most recently the two-hour Line Dialogue 5 at the opening of the ‘Again and Again and Again’ exhibition, Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada (view also Again and Again post). 

Again and Again and Again

JG again and again1 JG again and again2 JG again and again3Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada
12 May – 3 September 2012
The curator of VAG invited Carali McCall and myself to perform a site-specific collaborative wall drawing, Line Dialogue 5 (left), on 25 May for the opening of the summer exhibition, Again and Again and Again: serial formats and repetitive actions. With cameras strapped to our bodies, we repeatedly marked the wall with charcoal and graphite as we moved back and forth along its 40-foot length throughout the two-hour performance.

REVIEW “AGAIN AND AGAIN AND AGAIN: A SERIOUSLY SERIAL EXHIBITION AT THE VAG On at the Vancouver Art Gallery from now until September 3rd is Again and Again and Again, an exhibition about seriality in art. The exhibition touches upon a plethora of latent themes within the seemingly simple parameters of repetition, from the ‘mechanistic repetition inherent in much domestic work and industrial labour, to the multiple versions afforded by technological developments, to the limits of endurance that have been tested by performance artists’. Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin, Frank Stella, Ed Ruscha’s iconic Los Angeles parking lots: the heavy-hitters are all there. The exhibition isn’t all history, however; it abounds with striking contemporary works as well, from Song Dong’s Fill the Sea, a symbolic comment on the British occupation of Hong Kong, to mesmerizing photographs of Giverny by Stephen Shore, to a sprawling collaborative drawing by Carali McCall and Jane Grisewood.”

Winsor Gallery, Vancouver, 10 August 2012