VOID

VOID @ St John on Bethnal Green, London  21 June – 7 July  2016
Artists: Louise Beer, Jane Grisewood, John Hooper, Rebecca Huxley, Melanie King, Joshua Space and  Sarah Sparkes. Talk from Chris Welch, Professor of Space
Engineering at the International Space University in Strasbourg, France.
1.BonBbw.IMG_6125lr  Blacker than Black IMG_6604 BlackHolebwlr IMG_6390  BlackHolesbwlr IMG_6378

My Black on Black: series of 22 drawings plus one wall hanging explore darkness, blackness – the void – through different black paints on black paper (31 x 31 each/ installation 190  x 126cm; wall hanging 250 x 150cm). Black Hole series: 20 photographs present a typology of voids found in numerous locations around the world (21 x 21cm each / installation 164 x 135cm).  Blacker than Black:  The optical black surface was developed specially for space telescopes and satellites as it absorbs almost all light (30 x 30cm) .

Blind Lines

Perform-ance Confer-ence @ Dove Street Studios, Norwich
28 November 2014
Blind Lines, two-hour performance drawing, with eyes closed throughout, using the wall as a canvas. The audience was invited to replicate the action and sensation of drawing ‘blind’ on the gallery wall. The event explored the relationship between artist and audience, and questioned the response to live action. Presented by Hannah Turner Wallis.
Supported by Norwich Arts Centre and Other/Other/Other.

365 drawings 365 dessins

Transitions in 365 drawings 365 dessins @ Openhand Openspace, Reading
24 – 27 September 2014, and forthcoming, Switzerland  6 – 17 May 2015
For this exhibition Cally Trench and Tineke Bruijnzeels made a drawing every day for a year, accompanied every week by a different guest artist. My seven sequential drawings reflect the shifting landscape observed while travelling between Hong Kong and New Zealand provided a further transition as the week went from 2013 into 2014. Through transitions of time, seasons and hemispheres the constant has been the mountainous terrain where the Hong Kong peaks morphed into the New Zealand Kaimai ranges.
White ink on 200gsm black paper; 14.8 x 76.5cm (14.8 x 10.5cm each)

Draw to Perform

Draw to Perform – Drawing Performance Symposium
@  Arebyte Gallery and ]performance s p a c e[ London
5-7 December 2013  Curated by Ram Samocha
Participating artists: John Court, Tony Orrico, Michel Platnic, dolanbay, Michael Namkung, Vera Martins, Daniel Ben-Hur, Judith ann Braun, Stuart Brisley, Robert Luzar, Kimbal Quist Bumstead, Katrina Brown, Ram Samocha, Hannah Turner Wallis, Nazir Tanbouli, Sally Madge, Jane Grisewood, Carali McCall, Maryclare Foá, Birgitta Hosea, Diogo Pimentão.

Draw to Perform curator Ram Samocha invited 20 artists to participate in the event, 10 giving live performances, including Carali McCall and myself. With cameras strapped to our bodies, we repeatedly marked the wall with charcoal and graphite as we moved back and forth throughout the 30-minute duration of the line dialogue performance. The 3-day symposium included evening video screenings as well as live drawing performances and discussions led by Ram Samocha, Nick Kaye, Professor of Performance Studies, University of Exeter and selected artists. Samocha writes: ‘The symposium will concentrate on the connection between performance art and drawing and the relevance of drawing as a modern medium. The symposium includes video screenings, live drawing performances, talks and lectures by artists and art historians.This symposium aims to promote the growing stream of live drawing performance, to distinguish it as a unique entity and allow it to rise from the eclectic, wider definition of performance art.
The twenty participating artists all consider their body of work to be fundamentally concerned with drawing, in that for them drawing connects elements of line, movement, space and time.’

VIEW http://vimeo.com/80489035

Dancing with Sirius

JaneG 1Sirius 329dps

  • Acquired by the Tate Library Collection

Dancing with Sirius: lines of light   (series of prints and artist book, 2013)
In the high altitude of the Chilean Andes, the cloudless sky revealed a dazzling canopy of stars as night fell over the Atacama Desert, a stargazer’s paradise. Standing on the summit of the aptly named Cerro Tololo, ‘mountain in front of the abyss’, and surrounded by the imposing white observatories in the dark cold atmosphere, there was one star that captivated me – Sirius – the brightest star in the night sky, and visible in both southern and northern hemispheres. Hypnotised by its brightness and movement I spent most of the night with a handheld camera intent on following this one dominant star. The random choreographic gestures of my arms, like drawing in the air, created lines of light, ephemeral ghost-like threads danced across the sky as each one became suspended in time in my camera.
Artist book: 48 pages; 160 x 210 cm; 28 photographs; edition of 30; produced by Book Works, London