Drawn Conversations 2

Notes on a Table series,  performance drawing, Drawn Together: Maryclare Foá, Jane Grisewood, Birgitta Hosea, Carali McCall,  June – August 2016

Notes on a Table (Peckham) 5 June 2016
Notes on a Table (Kleine Red) 2 July 2016
Notes on a Table (Folkestone Green) and  (Folkestone Blue) 25 August 2016, performance drawing @ Whelkboy Gallery, Creative Quarter, Folkestone
Notes on a Table (Markings) 8–9 July 2016,  ‘Markings: Illustration and Performance Festival’ @ Central Saint Martins, Granary Square Kings Cross London. Drawn Together performed in the Lethaby Gallery (drawing 240 x 128 cm). Along with live performances the festival included a symposium, film screening, workshops and exhibitions with broad themes on theatre, fashion and drawing.

 

Advertisements

Drawn Conversations

Notes on a Table,  Maryclare Foá, Jane Grisewood, Birgitta Hosea, Carali McCall), Drawn Conversations exhibition @ Coventry University
4 December 2015

Top right: Notes on a Table (Reunion) 2015  240 x 128 cm, graphite and coloured pencil on paper  Bottom: Notes on a Table (after John Cage) 2010 240 x 128 cm, graphite and black crayon on paper

‘Drawn Together’, formed in 2008, is a London-based group of four artists who collaborate on performance drawing projects and share theoretical and research interests. Working with graphite and light, sound and animation they perform drawing processes and address the relationship between the body and presence, time and space. Notes on a Table includes two large drawings (each two-hour duration) made while in conversation gathered around a rectangular kitchen table. The first drawing in 2010 was followed by a second one this year, on the same surface in the same space to prompt conversation on what drawing together again might mean, or change,  five years on. This exhibition curated by Jill Journeaux and Helen Gorrill was part of the Drawing Conversations symposium reflecting on collective and collaborative drawing experiences.

Blind Lines

Perform-ance Confer-ence @ Dove Street Studios, Norwich
28 November 2014
Blind Lines, two-hour performance drawing, with eyes closed throughout, using the wall as a canvas. The audience was invited to replicate the action and sensation of drawing ‘blind’ on the gallery wall. The event explored the relationship between artist and audience, and questioned the response to live action. Presented by Hannah Turner Wallis.
Supported by Norwich Arts Centre and Other/Other/Other.

Mourning Lines

Mourning Lines in ‘Book Act’ @ The Tetley, Leeds,  March 2014
Live performance  9 March 2014 accompanied by video (2006/2014)
and artist book (2010)

  • 3 book set in slipcase acquired by the Tate Library Collection

Since the first ‘ash walk’ in 2005, and subsequent video a year later, I have performed Mourning Lines many times in many different ways, from drawing lines on paper,  to simply walking between familiar and poignant places. For this event Mourning Lines comprised of three different media:
Performance: 30-minute performance drawing with invitation to the audience to participate; charcoal on paper, overall 500 x 75 cm
Video: Recording of live performance trailing ash on 500-metre walk between home and the village burial ground. DVD; silent; 9’42”; filmed and edited by Ron Suffield
Book:  Accompanying book with sequence of 7 graphite drawings made during walks.

Separations at Eagle Gallery

Punctuations, Separations and Artists’ Books
@ Eagle Gallery/EMH Arts, London
21 June – 19 July 2013

  • Books acquired by the Tate and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London 
  • Selected ‘The Best Books for 2011’ by Elizabeth Tonnard for Photo-eye Magazine, USA

Separations exhibited at Eagle Gallery, London, includes 9 prints (33 x 33cm, Giclee printed on 300gsm Somerset paper); 8 special edition cloth-covered solander boxes with books and 11 s/s prints (17x12x2cm); and individual books (24pp, 15x10cm), produced by Book Works.
Elizabeth Tonnard writes: ‘
A small, restrained book of tiny seascapes. At first they look like watercolors. The beauty lies in the fact that the photos more or less leave behind their representational qualities to become objects on top of the page. These objects are anonymous, empty, they exist in their color.’
Emma Hill, Eagle Gallery writes: A pared down, minimalist approach is apparent in the works of Jane Grisewood… Separations 2011 – 2013 is a book and related sequence of prints that were inspired by the vast tracts of water that separate the artist’s native New Zealand from Britain. Using the most basic of landscape indicators – the horizontal line, Grisewood has brought together a collection of haunting photographic images made from film, digital camera and mobile phone.’