Draw to Perform

Draw to Perform – Drawing Performance Symposium
@  Arebyte Gallery and ]performance s p a c e[ London
5-7 December 2013  Curated by Ram Samocha
Participating artists: John Court, Tony Orrico, Michel Platnic, dolanbay, Michael Namkung, Vera Martins, Daniel Ben-Hur, Judith ann Braun, Stuart Brisley, Robert Luzar, Kimbal Quist Bumstead, Katrina Brown, Ram Samocha, Hannah Turner Wallis, Nazir Tanbouli, Sally Madge, Jane Grisewood, Carali McCall, Maryclare Foá, Birgitta Hosea, Diogo Pimentão.

Draw to Perform curator Ram Samocha invited 20 artists to participate in the event, 10 giving live performances, including Carali McCall and myself. With cameras strapped to our bodies, we repeatedly marked the wall with charcoal and graphite as we moved back and forth throughout the 30-minute duration of the line dialogue performance. The 3-day symposium included evening video screenings as well as live drawing performances and discussions led by Ram Samocha, Nick Kaye, Professor of Performance Studies, University of Exeter and selected artists. Samocha writes: ‘The symposium will concentrate on the connection between performance art and drawing and the relevance of drawing as a modern medium. The symposium includes video screenings, live drawing performances, talks and lectures by artists and art historians.This symposium aims to promote the growing stream of live drawing performance, to distinguish it as a unique entity and allow it to rise from the eclectic, wider definition of performance art.
The twenty participating artists all consider their body of work to be fundamentally concerned with drawing, in that for them drawing connects elements of line, movement, space and time.’

VIEW http://vimeo.com/80489035

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On Duration

JG on duration

Performance Research, Volume 17 No. 5 October 2012
Published by Routledge ISSN 1352-8165 (print) ISSN 1469-9990 (online)
To view article Click: On Duration 

LINE DIALOGUES: MARKING TIME AND PROCESS
Jane Grisewood and Carali McCall
The artists’ pages in Performance Research journal’s On Duration October issue present images from our performative-based art practice, which interrogates the relationship between drawing and performance to explore themes of duration, movement and the transmission of energy. The repetitive and continuous action of mark-making in the one to two-hour performances identifies the body as a tool to stretch time and record temporal presence, while challenging how the body experiences duration through drawing. Carali and I have collaborated on drawing performances in the UK and abroad for six years, most recently the two-hour Line Dialogue 5 at the opening of the ‘Again and Again and Again’ exhibition, Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada (view also Again and Again post).